Charles County Department of Emergency Services Reminds Citizens that Spring Marks the Start of Tornado Season

March 31, 2016

tornado watchNow that tornado season is here, the Charles County Department of Emergency Services encourages residents to be prepared.  Tornadoes are violent by nature and capable of completely destroying well-made structures, uprooting trees and hurling objects like deadly missiles.  A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour.

Prepare a Home Tornado Plan

  • Pick a place where family members could gather if a tornado is headed your way. It could be your basement or, if there is no basement, a center hallway, bathroom, or closet on the lowest floor. Keep this place uncluttered.
  • If you are in a high-rise building, you may not have enough time to go to the lowest floor. Pick a place in a hallway in the center of the building.

Watch vs. Warning: What’s the Difference?

  • Tornado Watch— Tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. Review and discuss your emergency plans, and check supplies and your safe room. Be ready to act quickly if a warning is issued or you suspect a tornado is approaching. Acting early helps to save lives!
  • Tornado Warning— A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Tornado warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Go immediately under ground to a basement, storm cellar or an interior room (closet, hallway or bathroom). In the open outdoors: If possible, seek shelter in a sturdy building. If not, lie flat and face-down on low ground, protecting the back of your head with your arms. Get as far away from trees and cars as you can; they may be blown onto you in a tornado. Flying debris is the greatest danger in tornadoes.

Signs of a Tornado:

  • Strong, persistent rotation in the cloud base.
  • Whirling dust or debris on the ground under a cloud base ¾ tornadoes sometimes have no funnel!
  • Hail or heavy rain followed by either dead calm or a fast, intense wind shift. Many tornadoes are wrapped in heavy precipitation and can’t be seen.
  • Day or night ¾Loud, continuous roar or rumble, which doesn’t fade in a few seconds like thunder.
  • Night ¾Small, bright, blue-green to white flashes at ground level near a thunderstorm (as opposed to silvery lightning up in the clouds). These mean power lines are being snapped by very strong wind, maybe a tornado.

Persistent lowering from the cloud base, illuminated or silhouetted by lightning — especially if it is on the ground or there is a blue-green-white power flash underneath.

After a Tornado:

Keep your family together and wait for emergency personnel to arrive. Carefully render aid to those who are injured. Stay away from power lines and puddles with wires in them; they may still be carrying electricity! Watch your step to avoid broken glass, nails, and other sharp objects. Stay out of any heavily damaged houses or buildings; they could collapse at any time. Do not use matches or lighters, in case of leaking natural gas pipes or fuel tanks nearby. Remain calm and alert, and listen for information and instructions from emergency crews or local officials.

For additional information, safety tips and public outreach resources, visit the following website: www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/safety.html and www.redcross.org/.

Severe weather notices are posted on the Charles County Government website, on Facebook, and on Twitter. Weather updates are also aired on CCGTV, which broadcasts on Comcast channel 95 and Verizon channel 10. Sign up for the Citizen Notification System (CNS) to receive inclement weather and traffic alerts by text message, email, or phone. For information on power outages, view the SMECO outage map. Call 877-747-6326 to report a power outage.  Call 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

One Response to Charles County Department of Emergency Services Reminds Citizens that Spring Marks the Start of Tornado Season

  1. oberver of April Fools Day on April 3, 2016 at 3:37 pm

    The Sheriff’s Department or police should not handle tornadoes by blocking off ravaged neighborhoods with their squad cars, thereby preventing residents from getting food, medicine and clothing as has happened in the past. Its ok to withhold donations, in part, from the Salvation Army, based upon the poor way they handled the after-effects of one tornado. No, it really wasn’t the volunteer field worker, it was the office staff.